Student Centre Concept @ York U

10.09.13

Pale Blue Dot

From this distant vantage point, the Earth might not seem of any particular interest. But for us, it’s different. Consider again that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner. How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity – in all this vastness – there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. The Earth is the only world known, so far, to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment, the Earth is where we make our stand. It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.

Carl Sagan

15.03.13
26.02.13

(Source: ssuccu-lent, via oldblueeyes)

07.02.13

Updated Work

05.02.13

bestrooftalkever:

oldblueeyes:

Alan Watts: What if money was no object? (x)

Man, what unbelievably shitty advice this is.

Clearly, making money the center of anything is a bad idea. Also, as someone who uses the trite phrase “follow your heart” unironically and extremely often, I would never advise someone to not look for passion in anything that they choose to do.

But there is also something to be said for realizing that your vocation doesn’t really identify yourself. Having to make sacrifices (like working a shitty job) in order to enjoy your passions in your free time (be it poetry or even like, being able to easily buy diapers for your lovely baby) is just the way that the world works. To state that “you’ll be doing things you don’t like doing in order to go on living” is just so sophomoric and simple and self-centered that it almost gives me a headache. There is no magic profession that unlocks your heart and sets you free.

It’s such a Western idea that you have to enjoy your job. In most other countries in the world, a job is something that you do in order to provide for yourself and your loved ones. And guess what! These people are usually never miserable at a desk, if only because they don’t believe the lie that says their workday deserves to be one big happy sunset-laden horse party. Interestingly, Alan Watts was known for integrating Eastern philosophies into Western culture. I won’t claim to know a ton about Eastern religions, but I do know that using that kind of ‘find-yourself’ philosophy in order to convince students (who are not buddhists/hindus/whatever) that they ought not to work towards financial responsibility is silly. So happy that it lives on 40 years later in an internet comic.

Also, can we stopppp romanticizing the arts like this? You think that chasing your passion for poetry means that your life will be happy? I went to art school, bro. I know artists. I know people who have pursued a career in art. They have their own unique set of struggles, too! They can’t always afford the kind of lifestyle that their peers can. It’s a constant grind to look for work or exposure. Even when they find it, they are sometimes forced to make compromises and do things that take away from the ‘integrity of their craft.’ When they do get a good project, you can see how incredibly happy and fulfilled they are, but these moments can be rare and also totally unreliable and inconsistent. Being a full-time artist can be an incredible burden to take on. LISTEN TO ME, CHILDREN OF AMERICA. Don’t believe the hype. If you want to pursue a future in art, I’m going to tell you not to do it. You know why? Because if you really have such an itching to create something to the degree that it will be the right thing for your future, you will stop at it no matter what. You will not brattishly say “But everyone knows your can’t earn any money that way!” KID IMA SMACK YOU. GO DO SOME DAMN PAPERWORK AND COME BACK WHEN YOU HAVE ENOUGH HUMILITY TO ADMIT THAT YOU DON’T DESERVE TO BE HAPPY AND FREE BEFORE YOU’RE EVEN OLD ENOUGH TO RENT A CAR.

Tupac once said “I didn’t choose the thug life, it chose me.” And a career in the arts is also kinda like the thug life. Ride or die…

 

29.01.13

dezeen:

Garden and House by Ryue Nishizawa

Photography by Iwan Baan

(via dezeen)

27.01.13
archiphile:

gardens by the bay by wilkinson eyre and grant associates

archiphile:

gardens by the bay by wilkinson eyre and grant associates

27.01.13
Explorations in Parametric Design

Explorations in Parametric Design

21.01.13
Rethinking Modular…..

Rethinking Modular…..

21.01.13